Welcome to Discuss Truth forums!

Would you like to join in discussion? Click here to sign up and become a part of our community today!

Sign Up

It is possible.

Discussion in 'Science' started by Jason76, Sep 21, 2016.

  1. Jason76 Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,656
    Likes Received:
    549
    Gender:
    Male
    At one time doing algebra was a nightmare, but now it's as easy as ABCs. So how does this transformation take place? I suppose it's only because of not being lazy.

    However, now tackling higher math than that, including a Physics course, will it be possible to reduce those subjects to ABCs? I guess only with a lot of work. How does the mind work in this regard?

    Honestly and not trying to sound dorky or arrogant, but algebra now from a high school text book is jokingly easy.
     
    #1
  2. jimbob Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,649
    Likes Received:
    702
    Gender:
    Male
    I had to drop algebra twice before I found an instructor who knew how to teach it in a manner that I could comprehend. Aced all three levels after that.
     
    #2
  3. Quality Checked Bird Moderator

    Posts:
    1,003
    Likes Received:
    550
    Gender:
    Male
    Algebra or Anglo Saxon or elaborate weaving becoming easy is what learning and practice is all about. You learn basic principles, you learn their application, you learn their elaboration, you learn the exceptions, and you practice applying what you learned. It's an upward spiral. Learning how to read, write, do arithmetic, and behave in class are all quite challenging to young children. Soon, though, they have learned to read, write, spell, do arithmetic, art work, and all sorts of other things. They learn, they practice. When adults learn new subject matter, it's the same thing. Little French children learn French without even knowing it. Adult English speakers learning French find that it is challenging because they work hard to add all that vocabulary and grammar patterns to their already loaded brain.

    It's the same with all topics, really. Were I to take a physics or chemistry class at this point I would probably find it moderately interesting, but I would also probably have difficulty learning, remembering, and applying all of the basic principles and terminology. At 70 my brain is even more loaded than it was at 30 or 40, and new information has to compete for space with all the stuff already there. (The brain can't store an infinite amount of information.)

    None the less, it is very GOOD for the brain to engage in continuous learning of reasonably difficult material throughout life. It isn't going to prevent alzheimers or senility, but (it is believed) it can delay or reduce the consequences. Like the effect of exercise on the muscles.

    By the way, in order for the brain to learn new information, new nerve connections have to be grown and strengthened. It's the growing and connecting, and reconnecting neurons that strengthens the brain.
     
    #3
  4. Quality Checked Bird Moderator

    Posts:
    1,003
    Likes Received:
    550
    Gender:
    Male
    I found mathematics challenging throughout my life. I passed a college statistics course by cook booking my way through it. Most people, outside the field of engineering and several technical or mathematical fields (like statisticians) do not use math a lot. I'm in no way suggesting that one shouldn't learn mathematics, but the assumption by teachers that everybody will use it for the rest of their lives is mistaken.
     
    #4
  5. jimbob Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,649
    Likes Received:
    702
    Gender:
    Male
    I actually cheated and took Statistics the same semester I took College Algebra and aced Statistics as well.

    No, I don't see where Algebra is important in every-day life. But I do believe that a strong background in general math is.

    I constantly use "break-even analysis" in many of my purchase/projects. I am working on one project right now. Ten months to break even; after that all will be savings of about $50/month.

    But yes, there are a lot of professions that require the use of algebra. Therefore it should be a prerequisite for a major in those professions.
     
    #5
  6. Jason76 Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,656
    Likes Received:
    549
    Gender:
    Male
    Physics is the big challenge now and in some ways worse than Calculus or Algebra cause it's all visualization. It's all applied math, rather than just solving equations. As the Physics professor said, math is just the tool to solve Physics, but it's not Physics.
     
    #6
  7. jimbob Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,649
    Likes Received:
    702
    Gender:
    Male
    I would never made it in calculus because I am unable to imagine an imaginary number.
     
    #7
  8. Decentlady Bacteria

    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    18
    Gender:
    Female
    It is not uncommon to hear that many students find maths a very challenging subject. Lots of them even drop out because of maths.

    I have always found maths tremendously interesting and I guess that's why I always excelled.

    However, I think it was my interest in numbers and the curiosity to master them that was the driving force behind it. During school holidays I would go for a next level maths text book and try and solve the problems without any assistance just to kill time. Infact, my favourite time pass was maths and physics instead of tv and friends. That pretty much sums it up why physics was my favourite too.

    Practice does make perfect. I am not perfect but it helped to pass the subject and made school life more easy.
     
    #8
    jimbob likes this.
  9. jimbob Cat Moderator

    Posts:
    2,649
    Likes Received:
    702
    Gender:
    Male
    You must not have had many interesting friends. Hehehe.
     
    #9
    Decentlady likes this.
  10. Shine_Spirit Bacteria

    Posts:
    25
    Likes Received:
    9
    Gender:
    Male
    I really can't see it that easy. I just really can't! [-X

    While I was in school, I tried different methods of study and I always had difficulties (although I always had a performance that was considered "good" by my teachers).

    In my case, the question of having difficulty wasn't linked to the fact of "laziness", because I always enjoyed studying. So my problem was because I did't really like that subject.

    I still don't like it, and thank God I don't depend on these kinds of subjects anymore (or I would be in trouble... which wouldn't be good :p).
     
    #10
    jimbob likes this.

Share This Page